Measuring Human Rights (8): Measurement of the Fairness of Trials and of Expert Witnesses

An important part of the system of human rights are the rules intended to offer those accused of crimes a fair trial in court. We try to treat everyone, even suspected criminals, with fairness, and we have two principal reasons for this:

  • We only want to punish real criminals. A fair trial is one in which everything is done to avoid punishing the wrong persons. We want to avoid miscarriages of justice.
  • We also want to use court proceedings only to punish criminals and deter crime, not for political or personal reasons, as is often the case in dictatorships.

Most of these rules are included in, for example, articles 9, 10, 14 and 15 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, article 10 of the Universal Declaration, article 6 of the European Convention of Human Rights, and the Sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

Respect for many of these rules can be measured statistically. I’ll mention only one here: the rule regarding the intervention of expert witnesses for the defense or the prosecution. Here’s an example of the way in which this aspect of a fair trial can measured:

In the late 1990s, Harris County, Texas, medical examiner [and forensic specialist] Patricia Moore was repeatedly reprimanded by her superiors for pro-prosecution bias. … In 2004, a statistical analysis showed Moore diagnosed shaken baby syndrome (already a controversial diagnosis) in infant deaths at a rate several times higher than the national average. … One woman convicted of killing her own child because of Moore’s testimony was freed in 2005 after serving six years in prison. Another woman was cleared in 2004 after being accused because of Moore’s autopsy results. In 2001, babysitter Trenda Kemmerer was sentenced to 55 years in prison after being convicted of shaking a baby to death based largely on Moore’s testimony. The prosecutor in that case told the Houston Chronicle in 2004 that she had “no concerns” about Moore’s work. Even though Moore’s diagnosis in that case has since been revised to “undetermined,” and Moore was again reprimanded for her lack of objectivity in the case, Kemmerer remains in prison. (source)

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